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AUGUST 2012
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KEAMCORRAVOOLY WEDGE TOMB, COUNTY CORK
This Wedge Tomb, marked as 'Cromlech' on both the OSI & Historic maps, is located just off a small road, on a
gentle SW facing slope on the east side of Owengarriff River valley, a tributary of River Lee, 'An Laoi' and is also
known by it’s Irish name as 'Caom Corra Voulla'. The tomb consists of a well preserved wedge-shaped gallery, 3.8
m in length, 1.2m in width at the west - 0.35m in width at the east and 1m in height at the entrance, that tapers
back to 0.50m at the back. The gallery, aligned ESE - WNW, is represented by four side-stones to the north and
south and a back-stone outside gallery walls at the east end; surrounded by closely set outer walling. Two of the
three roof stones remain in place, covering the gallery, with the smaller middle roof stone lying on top of the much
larger end roof stone which extends beyond the end of the chamber. The chamber is now below the surrounding
ground surface level and there is no indications of a surrounding mound. According to Finlay in 1973, there are
six cup marks on one roof stone and five on another.
Keamcorravooly wedge tomb by William C. Borlase from
‘The Dolmens of Ireland’ Vol. 1 (1897)
The above text & images are from the book ‘Of Druids Altars & Giants Graves’
( The Megalithic Tombs of Ireland ) available @
AMAZON and also available from our E-SHOP
LY WEDGE TOMB, COUNTY CORK
Borlase, in his book “The Dolmens of Ireland” Vol. 1 (1897), compares his description with that of Windele. He
wrote: “In the town-land of Keamcorravooly, is a dolmen called Giants Grave. I think this must be the ‘Gotigaun
Barra’ dolmen of Windele. The name is also written ‘Caom Curra Voulla’ (Bhulla). The dolmen which Windele
describes lay, as this one does, E. and W., or more truly W.N.W. and E.S.E., and had two incumbent stones. He
speaks, however, of three instead of four lines of pillar-stones ; but his ‘three pillars’ at one end, which probably,